Primary metadata record describing Coastal Ocean Reasearch and Monitoring Program (CORMP) Biooptical data

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Metadata:


Identification_Information:
Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator:
Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program at Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Publication_Date: 20050307
Title:
Primary metadata record describing Coastal Ocean Reasearch and Monitoring Program (CORMP) Biooptical data
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: spreadsheet
Other_Citation_Details:
Online_Linkage: <http://www.cormp.org>
Description:
Abstract:
CORMP was initiated as a research and observation program focusing on the collection of data applicable to physical and ecological predictive models, fisheries sustainability, and habitat quality. CORMP consists of four focus areas: Ocean Observations, Data Management, Ecosystem Research and Modeling, and Outreach and Education that operate synergistically to: 1) provide a regional hub (SE US) in a national observing system; 2) collect and disseminate physical and ecological data; and 3) engage regional partners, stakeholders and end-users in the development and implementation of a sustainable coastal-ocean observing program. CORMP capitalizes on a combination of instrumented moorings, remote sensing and ecosystem models, and traditional ship-based observations to establish baseline conditions, identify responses to stochastic events, predict and verify long-term trends and identify linkages among coastal ocean ecosystem components. The information collected by CORMP help researchers determine a mechanistic understanding of factors affecting productivity in the coastal ocean in the region and will provide information that can be and is directly used in local-to federal fisheries management. Further, information collected by CORMP will be used by partner organizations to provide a real-time forecasting. The operational area for the CORMP observing network extends from estuaries (including the Cape Fear River Estuary and it's plume) to the coast, across the continental margin to the Gulf Stream, and from the SC/NC border to north of Cape Lookout. <1> Mooring: Core variables collected at each mooring includes water temperature and salinity, water column currents, surface wave directional spectra data. On some selected mooring stations, CORMP also measure turbidity and fluorescence. <2> Cruise: We sample the cape fear river plume every month by collecting data with a YSI-6820 Water Quality Sonde. This instrument measures (Temperature, Salinity, pH, Conductivity, Dissolved Oxygen, and Turbidity.) We collect Total Nitrate, Total phosphate, Nitrate, Phosphate, Ammonium and Chlorophyll a. Zooplankton samples are also collected at four of the plume stations. Our Onslow Bay sampling cruises are conducted bi-monthly. We sample six stations, each approximately five nautical miles apart, beginning at the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy and extending out to approximately 27 miles offshore. Our most offshore sampling station (OB27) also serves as the location for a fixed underwater instrument mooring. Basic data including time (GMT), latitude, longitude, water depth, sea surface temperature, weather conditions, and sea state are noted upon arrival at every station. When on station, scientists take measurements of physical parameters (temperature, currents, salinity, etc.), light attenuation and collect water samples for analysis of nutrients, phytoplankton pigments, and CDOM using a Seabird SBE-25 CTD rosette.
Purpose:
The strategic plan for the Congressionally mandated Integrated Ocean Observations System (IOOS) calls for a sustained, integrated system to improve weather forecasting, predictions of climate change and related impacts on coastal populations, safety and efficiency of marine operations, and coastal ecosystem health. The Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (CORMP) at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) is a research and monitoring program that addresses these goals in the coastal ocean. The program mission is to provide an interdisciplinary science-based framework that supports sound public policy leading to wise coastal use, sustainable fisheries and improved coastal ocean ecosystem health.
Supplemental_Information:
The penetration, absorption, and availability of light are of great importance in assessing the physico-chemical characteristics of a water mass. Changes in the optical characteristics of water masses may be used to determine the relative influences of anthropogenic or natural impacts on the biological components of coastal system. Coastal waters can vary greatly in their optical water quality and these variations affect photosynthetic compensation depths for phytoplankton and macrophytes and set fundamental limits on the rate of primary production of coastal waters (Gallegos et al., 1990). In optical studies it is necessary to determine both inherent and apparent optical properties; apparent optical latter properties vary in relation to both the content of the water and the ambient light field (Kirk, 1994). Inherent optical properties of coastal waters are affected by optically important variables such as turbidity (tripton), phytoplankton (chlorophylls, carotenoids, biliproteins, etc.), and dissolved organic matter (e.g., gilvin, CDOM) The individual components have an additive effect to the spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd(&#955;)total. That is Kd(&#955;)total= Kd(&#955;)water + Kd(&#955;)phytoplankton + Kd(&#955;)tripton + Kd(&#955;)gilvin Kd(&#955;)total is most readiliy determined by measuring profiles of downwelling, cosine corrected spectral irradiance (Gallegos et al., 1990; Gallegos and Kenworthy, 1996). Partitioning the contributions to Kd(&#955;)total, especially contributions by pigments and CDOM, can contribute to the development and refinement of algorithms used in remote sensing and bio-optical modeling of coastal waters. The resulting bio-optical models can be used for the purpose of satellite-based monitoring of the efficacy of management activities.
Time_Period_of_Content:
Time_Period_Information:
Range_of_Dates/Times:
Beginning_Date: 20000101
Ending_Date: 20060731
Currentness_Reference: Observed
Status:
Progress: In Work
Maintenance_and_Update_Frequency: As Needed
Spatial_Domain:
Bounding_Coordinates:
West_Bounding_Coordinate: -78.60
East_Bounding_Coordinate: -76.13
North_Bounding_Coordinate: 34.81
South_Bounding_Coordinate: 33.14
Keywords:
Theme:
Theme_Keyword_Thesaurus: GCMD
Theme_Keyword:
Water Quality, Turbidity, Ocean Color, Inherent & Apparent Optical Properties,
Place:
Place_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Place_Keyword:
Cape Fear River Plume, Onslow Bay, Long Bay, CMS, UNCW, Wilmington, North Carolina, Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, NOAA, CFP1, CFP2, CFP3, CFP4, CFP5, CFP6, CFP7, CFP8, CFP9, CFP11, CFP12, OBSB, OB5, OB10, OB15, OB20, OB27, OB27B, Gulf Stream, South Atlantic Bight
Stratum:
Stratum_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Stratum_Keyword:
water column, surface layer, photic zone, river plume, shelf waters
Temporal:
Temporal_Keyword_Thesaurus: None
Temporal_Keyword: 2005
Temporal_Keyword: 2004
Temporal_Keyword: 2003
Temporal_Keyword: 2002
Temporal_Keyword: 2001
Temporal_Keyword: 2000
Access_Constraints:
None. It is strongly recommended that the UNCW CORMP Data be directly acquired from Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina at Wilmington and not indirectly through other sources as they might have been changed in some way.
Use_Constraints:
The Principal Investigators (Originators), University of North Carolina at Wilmington Center for Marine Science, and the Grantor (See Data_Set_Credit) should be fully acknowledged in any publications in which any part of these data are used. Use of the data without completely reading and understanding of the metadata is not recommended. CORMP in University of North Carolina at Wilmington is not responsible for the misuse of data.
Point_of_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Michael J. Durako
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: Mailing Address
Address:
UNCW Center for Marine Science 5600 Marvin K. Moss Road Wilmington, NC 28409
City: Wilmington
State_or_Province: North Carolina
Postal_Code: 28409
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 910-962-2373
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 910-962-2410
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: durakom@uncw.edu
Hours_of_Service: 8.00 am to 5.00 pm EST/EDT Monday-Friday
Contact_Instructions: E-mail preferred
Data_Set_Credit:
The UNCW CORMP is a NOAA funded program, with Drs. Marvin Moss, Lynn Leonard and Michael Durako as Principal Investigators. Numerous researchers, faculty, post-docs, technicians, graduate students, and data managers have contributed to these datasets.
Native_Data_Set_Environment:
The raw and decoded data from the UNCW CORMP monitoring stations are stored in Linux and Windows based computers and are presently served via Internet (<http://www.cormp.org>).

Data_Quality_Information:
Attribute_Accuracy:
Attribute_Accuracy_Report:
LiCor Quantum sensors calibrated every 2 years - calibration coefficients accurate to 0.01 umoles quanta m-2 s-1
Logical_Consistency_Report: N/A
Completeness_Report:
Lineage:
Methodology:
Methodology_Type: Field/Lab
Methodology_Description:
SPECTRAL K PARTITIONING - WATER SAMPLE PROCESSING Field sampling 1. Collect 2-4 L surface water sample (fill bottle(s) 10 cm below surface). 2. Place sample in numbered 1 or 2L HDPE bottle, record bottle(s) number on data sheet, and place bottle in dark on ice. Laboratory processing - Raw and Filtered Water Samples Total spectral absorption will be measured on GF/F filters and water samples in a 10cm quartz cuvette in a cuvette chamber attached to Ocean Optics S2000 spectrometer and a halogen (filter samples) or Halogen-deuterium (water samples) light source. Always do 3 rinses of glassware when changing samples! For each station there will be three types of water placed in the cuvette: (B)lank = DI water, Yellow = 0.2 um filtered sample(CDOM) Total= Raw water sample 1. Pour about 300ml of Raw seawater sample into the Raw squirt bottle. This will be used for Total absorption. 2. Filter enough water onto a 47mm Whatman GF/F to result in visible color on filter (usually 500ml-1l for inshore and CFP samples and 4l for offshore OB samples). Place the GF/F filter in a numbered petri plate and wrap in foil or place in the dark on ice (or in refrigerator). . Record volume of water filtered and dish number on data sheet. 3. Refilter about 300 ml of the GF/F filtrate through a 0.2 um filter. This will be the Yellow (CDOM) fraction. Place this fraction in the CDOM squirt bottle. 4. Fill the 10 cm cuvette with distilled water Raw Sample vs Blank(DIwater) = Total spectral absorption Raw Sample vs Yellow (CDOM) = Spectral Absorption due to particles Yellow (CDOM) vs Blank (DIwater) = Spectral absorption due to dissolved substances (Gelbshtoff) 5. Open OOIBase in scope mode. With distilled water reference cuvette (B) in chamber and the filler ports vertical, adjust integration period to get about 3500 counts (1500 w/electrical dark correction) at peak. For the Halogen deuterium light source w/400um light fiber and 200um receive fiber: Int.Per=75msec, Av=10, Boxcar=10. (For Methanol extracts in 1cm cuvette: Int.Per=100 Av=10 Boxcar=10) 6. View > spectrum scale > set scale > x scale 300 to 750 nm. 7. Close shutter in cuvette chamber or block light at source. Click on dark bulb icon (dark reference) 8. Open shutter click on lighted bulb (reference). Check on Correct for Electrical Dark (should already be checked). 9. Click on A (absorbance) and make sure the red line is active an near 0 10. Remove Blank cuvette. Pour out the DI and refill cuvette with Raw seawater sample from the squirt bottle. Place cuvette in chamber with the filler ports vertical. 11. Right click > autoscale - to maximize signal. Make sure you have an absorbance spectra with the red line above zero on x-axis. . Make sure you place cuvettes with fill port vertical. 12. To save the spectra, click on the camera icon (snapshot). Save > Processed > filename.Master.Absorbance. (totalspec_st#). Pour out Raw seawater sample 13. Refill cuvette with 0.2um filtered water sample (CDOM vs Blank) to determine absorbance due to dissolved substances (yellow_st#). For CDOM use the halogen/deuterium light source with a 400um fiber, 75 int per., 10 av., and 10 boxcar. 14. Go to scope mode and Zero the CDOM sample by clicking on the light bulb icon. Click on A (absorbance) and make sure the red line is active near zero. Pour out the CDOM sample and refill cuvetted with Raw seawater. Click on the camera (snapshot). Save>Processed>filename.Master.Absorbance (Raw vs CDOM) (particles_st#). 15.Optical density is multiplied by 2.3 and 10 to convert to base e and to an absorption coefficient (m-1). [spectral absorption coefficient = (2.3 x absorbance)/0.1 m. 10cm cell=0.1m] Absorbance values are corrected for Backscattering by subtracting absorbance @750nm from all values. Laboratory processing - Particle and Phytoplankton coefficients 1. Total particle absorption spectra will be measured using the filter pad method by comparing absorption spectra through a wetted GF/F filter (distilled water) as the Blank and the spectra through the filter with particles. To correct for Mie scattering (and spectral differences between the reference and sample filters), the optical density at 750 nm is subtracted from the entire spectrum before calculating absorption. The halogen light source is used for these samples. 2. Filter 500 ml (CFP) to 4 l (OB) of water through a GF/F filter and record the volume on the data sheet. After filtering, place filter in a numbered glass plate and put in refrigerator. Keep in dark until ready to measure. 3. Place Blank filter wetted with DI water from squirt bottle in filter holder and place in filter slot of 10cm cuvette holder with filter nearest to chamber. Cover with black battery case lid to prevent light signal from room. 4. Open OOIBase in scope mode. With water Blank filter in holder, adjust integration period to get about 3500 counts at peak (1500 w/dark correction). Use no filter at light source w/400um light fiber and 200um receive fiber: Int.Per=1250msec, Av=1, Boxcar=10. 5. View > spectrum scale > set scale > x scale 350 to 750 nm. 6. Block light source with floppy shutter chamber. Click on dark bulb icon (dark reference) 7. Open shutter click on lighted bulb (reference). Check on Correct for Electrical Dark. 8. Click on A (absorbance) and make sure the red line is active an near 0 9. Remove Blank filter and place sample (S) filter in holder with sample side facing the chamber and light source. 10. Right click > autoscale - to maximize signal. Make sure you have an absorbance spectra with the red line near to, or above, zero on x-axis. You may have to slightly adjust the position of the filter in the slot. 11. To save the spectra, click on the camera icon (snapshot). Save > Processed > filtertotal_st#.master.absorbance. 12. After measurement, the filter will be extracted in the dark for 60 min in 50 ml absolute methanol in a glass petri dish. The filter is then wetted with DI water and the absorption spectra measured as above. filtermeth_st#.master.absorbance Make sure the sample material side is facing the chamber and light source. 13. Absorbances will be converted to spectral absorption coefficients by multiplying by 2.3 to convert to base e and by A/V where A is the area of the filter (3.5 cm dia filter area =0.00096 m2) and V is the volume filtered (m3) from the data sheet. 1 liter = 0.001 m3 4 liters = 0.004 m3 750 ml = 0.00075 m3 500 ml = 0.0005 m3 Subtract absorbance @ 750 nm from all wavelengths to correct for Mie scattering (Kishino et al., 1985). For Pigments in Methanol 1. Switch to Halogen Deuterium light source. 2. In scope mode place 1cm quartz cuvette filled with methanol for blank. IntPer = 100 Av = 10 Boxcar = 10 3. Close shutter - click on dark bulb - Dark Blank 4. Open shutter - click on lighted bulb - Blank. Then click on Absorbance. You should have an active red line near 0. 5. Rinse Blank once with clean Methanol, rinse 2X’s with methanol extract, and fill w/methanol extract 6. Read absorbance. Click on camera. Save > Processed > pigment_OBxx.master.absorbance 7. Dump extract, rinse 3X’s with clean methanol, Re-Blank, rinse 2X’s w/new extract and Fill with new extract. Sample Data Processing Spectral data for each station will be imported into QPW and processed to yield spectra k values for Sample, Particles, Gelbshtoff, TSS, TSSw/o Pigments and Pigments. 1. Open QPW and open a previous month’s spreadsheet. Then open a new blank spreadsheet. 2. On first notebook page label (A) right click > edit sheet name > SampleWater enter 3. To bring in spectral data: Insert > File click on open file folder and go to the current month’s directory. Type *.* in file name window. 4. Click on totalspec_cfp#.Master.Absorbance > Open > OK. When Quick Columns Expert Window pops up click on Parse. The spectral data will appear on the sheet. 5. To delete rows from 117.36 nm - 299.74 nm, block and drag in the row number column then Edit> Delete Rows. Repeat for rows 750.50 to End Spectral Data. 6. In Cell A1 copy and paste Station and month Label from previous month’s spreadsheet and edit to correct date. In cells A14 and B14 type nm and O.D. respectively. 7. Copy and paste Cuvette correction from the quartz cuvette correction sheet. Copy and pasted corrected O.D and Sample k columns from previous month’s spreadsheet. 8. Repeat steps 2-7 for a Particles sheet and Gelbshtoff sheet 9. The fourth notebook sheet will have all the spectral k values and it separates the water data from the filter data. Block all the columns of the first sheet (SampleWater) > Edit > Convert to values click the arrow in the To window and click on the A1 cell of the fourth notebook sheet. Click the Convert to Values Banner and click OK. Edit sheet name to Spectral k, delete all columns except nm and Sample k. 10. For Particles and Gelbshtoff, highlight the k value column > Edit > convert to Values> up arrow in To > click on the next column in the Spectral k sheet > OK 11. The fifth and sixth sheets will have the Totalfilter and filtermeth spectra. The absorbances will be corrected for MIE scattering by subtracting the Absorbance at 750.18 from all wavelengths. 12. Absorbances will be converted to spectral absorption coefficients by multiplying by 2.3 to convert to base e and by A/V where A is the area of the filter (3.5 cm dia filter area =0.00096 m2) and V is the volume filtered (m3) from the data sheet. 4 liter = 0.004 m3 1 liter = 0.001 m3, 750 ml = 0.00075 m3, 500 ml = 0.0005 m3 13. TSS and TSS w/o pigments k columns are converted to values as above and added to the Spectral k notebook page. Pigment k is calculated by subtraction. 14. Each station’s Spectral k page is copied to a new spreadsheet called Allspectralk.MonYR. The data in this spreadsheet is copied to SigmaPlot to generate spectral k curves for the various components. this is done by opening SPW and opening the previous month’s file and copy and pasting the current month’s data to the Data Worksheet. The Allk graph may need some adjustments of the y-axis and the month label needs to be changed. Variable Names nm = wavelength of light Raw Sample a = Total spectral absorption (m-1) of the raw water sample Particle a = Spectral absorption (m-1) due to particles in the raw water sample CDOM a = Spectral absorption (m-1) due to colored dissolved organic matter in the water (Gelbshtoff ) Filter TSS a = Total spectral absorption (m-1) of filter after filtering volume of seawater TSSwoPigments = spectral absorption (m-1) of filter after 2 h extraction with methanol Pigment a = spectral absorption (m-1) on filter due to methanol-soluble pigments
Methodology_Citation:
Citation_Information:
Originator: Unknown
Publication_Date: Unknown
Title:
Gallegos, C. L., D. L. Correll, and J. W. Pierce. 1990. Modeling spectral diffuse attenuation, absorption, and scattering coefficients in a turbid estuary. Limnol. Oceanogr. 35:1486-1502. Gallegos, C. L and W. J. Kenworthy. 1996. Seagrass depth limits in the Indian River Lagoon (Florida, U.S.A.): Application of an optical model. Est. Coastal Shelf Sci. 42:267-288. Kirk, J. T. O. 1994. Light and photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems. 2nd edition, Cambridge Univ. Press, New York, 401 pp. McPherson, B. F. and R. L. Miller. 1987. The vertical attenuation of light in Charlotte Harbor, a shallow subtropical estuary, southwestern Florida. Estuar. Coastal Shelf Sci. 25:721-737. Mueller, J. L. and R. W. Austin. 1994. Ocean optics protocols for SeaWIFS validation, revision 1. Vol. 25 SeaWIFS Tech. Rept. Ser., NASA Tech. Mem. 104566. 67 pp. Kowalczuk, P., M. J. Durako and W. J. Cooper. Comparison of radiometric qunatities measured in water and above water and derived from SeaWiFS imagery in Onslow Bay and Cape Fear River plume area. Ocean Optics OOXVI. Mallin, M.A., L.B. Cahoon, M.R. McIver, D.C. Parsons and G.C. Shank. 1999a. Alternation of factors limiting phytoplankton production in the Cape Fear Estuary. Estuaries 22: 985-996. Mallin, M.A., M.H. Posey, G.C. Shank, M.R. McIver, S.H. Ensign and T.D. Alphin. 1999b. Hurricane effects on water quality and benthos in the Cape Fear Watershed: Natural and anthropogenic impacts. Ecological Applications 9: 350-362. Roesler, C. S. 1998. Theoretical and experimental approaches to improve the accuracy of particulate absorption coefficients derived from the quantitative filter technique. Limnology and Oceanography 43: 1649-1660. Schwarz, J. N. et al. 2002. Two models of gelstoff absorption. Oceanologia 44(2):209- 241.
Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: Unknown
Process_Step:
Process_Description:
Diffuse attenuation coefficient for Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400-700nm) KdPAR: At each sampling station, simultaneous light measurements will be made in the air and in the water using scalar irradiance sensors (LiCor LI-193SA) connected to a LiCor LI-1000 datalogger. A light profile will be determined by lowering the in-water sensor to a series of measurement depths (0.5-1.0 m intervals) and recording average (5-10 sec) scalar irradiance from both sensors. The in-air sensor reading will be used to adjust the in-water readings for changes in the incident irradiance over the course of the profile. KdPAR will be calculated from the slope of the regression of natural log-transformed percentages of surface irradiance (in water PAR:in air PAR) against depth. Downwelling, cosine-corrected, spectral irradiance [Kd(8)] from 200-850nm will be measured using a 200µm optical fiber terminated with a cosine corrector and attached to an Ocean Optics S2000 spectrometer. Spectral irradiance will be determined at a series of measurement depths (0.5-1.0m). Readings will be normalized to the readings from the in-air sensor, natural-log transformed, and regressed against depth to calculate Kd(lambda) (wavelength-specific diffuse attenuation coefficient). Partitioning Kd(lambda): Water samples from discrete depth intervals will be analyzed for total and mineral solids, chlorophyll a, turbidity, and absorption by dissolved and particulate matter. Analyses of raw water versus filtered water samples will be used to separate the contribution to Kd(8) between particulate and dissolved components of the water mass. Total suspended solids (TSS) will be determined by filtering a known volume of water through a tared, precombusted (1 h @ 500 C) Whatman GF/F filter. Concentration of TSS will be determined by weight gain of dried filters and the volume of water filtered. Filters will then be combusted at 500 C for 2h to combust organic matter and reweighed. Mineral TSS will be determined by difference. Turbidity will be determined using YSI field instruments and chlorophyll a will be assessed as below. Absorbance of particulate matter will be determined by illuminating material collected on a GF/F filter with a fibre optic light source and measuring the absorbance spectra normalized with readings from a moistened blank filter. The sample filter will then be soaked in methanol for >1h to extract phytoplankton pigments, and scanned again to estimate absorption by non-algal particulate matter. Absorption will be converted to units of m-1 by multiplying by the area of the filter and dividing by the volume filtered. Absorption by dissolved matter will be measured on water samples filtered through a 0.2µm Nucleopore filter. Absorbance will be read using scanning spectrophotometer in 10 cm cells against distilled water blanks. Absorbance readings will be multiplied by 2.303 to convert to base e and divided by 0.1 (dm m-1).
Process_Date: Unknown
Cloud_Cover: Unknown

Spatial_Data_Organization_Information:
Indirect_Spatial_Reference:
The operational area for the UNCW CORMP observing network extends from estuaries (including the Cape Fear River Estuary and it's plume) to the coast, across the continental margin to the Gulf Stream, and from the SC/NC border to north of Cape Lookout.
Direct_Spatial_Reference_Method: Point
Point_and_Vector_Object_Information:
SDTS_Terms_Description:
SDTS_Point_and_Vector_Object_Type: Point
Point_and_Vector_Object_Count: 25

Entity_and_Attribute_Information:
Overview_Description:
Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
For details on the information cotained in the data set, please go to URL:<http://www.cormp.org>. Work is in progress to update the information available at the web site.
Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation:
Variable Names nm = wavelength of light Raw Sample a = Total spectral absorption (m-1) of the raw water sample Particle a = Spectral absorption (m-1) due to particles in the raw water sample CDOM a = Spectral absorption (m-1) due to colored dissolved organic matter in the water (Gelbshtoff ) Filter TSS a = Total spectral absorption (m-1) of filter after filtering volume of seawater TSSwoPigments = spectral absorption (m-1) of filter after 2 h extraction with methanol Pigment a = spectral absorption (m-1) on filter due to methanol-soluble pigments

Distribution_Information:
Distributor:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Michael J. Durako
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: Mailing Address
Address:
UNCW Center for Marine Science 5600 Marvin K. Moss Road Wilmington, NC 28409
City: Wilmington
State_or_Province: North Carolina
Postal_Code: 28409
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 910-962-2373
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 910-962-2410
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: durakom@uncw.edu
Hours_of_Service: 8.00 am to 5.00 pm EST/EDT Monday-Friday
Contact_Instructions: E-mail preferred
Distribution_Liability:
Realtime data provided by CORMP should be considered provisional. Quality controlled data for any particular location are available only in the archived data area of this website. While all due care is taken to provide accurate information, provisional data are subject to change or retraction after quality control and before official release. No warranty is made, express or implied, regarding the accuracy or validity of the data, or regarding the suitability of the data for any particular application. Use of provisional data is at the sole risk of the user.
Standard_Order_Process:
Digital_Form:
Digital_Transfer_Information:
Format_Name:
Ascii File, Formatted For Text Attributes, Declared Format (ASCII)
Format_Version_Number: N/A
Digital_Transfer_Option:
Online_Option:
Computer_Contact_Information:
Network_Address:
Network_Resource_Name: <http://www.cormp.org>
Fees: None

Metadata_Reference_Information:
Metadata_Date: 20050223
Metadata_Contact:
Contact_Information:
Contact_Person_Primary:
Contact_Person: Michael J. Durako
Contact_Address:
Address_Type: Mailing Address
Address:
UNCW Center for Marine Science 5600 Marvin K. Moss Road Wilmington, NC 28409
City: Wilmington
State_or_Province: North Carolina
Postal_Code: 28409
Country: USA
Contact_Voice_Telephone: 910-962-2373
Contact_Facsimile_Telephone: 910-962-2410
Contact_Electronic_Mail_Address: durakom@uncw.edu
Hours_of_Service: 8.00 am to 5.00 pm EST/EDT Monday-Friday
Contact_Instructions: E-mail preferred
Metadata_Standard_Name:
Content Standards for National Biological Information Infrastructure Metadata
Metadata_Standard_Version: FGDC-STD-001-1998

Generated by mp version 2.9.0 on Mon Jun 26 15:08:21 2006